Concussions can be a Real Headache for Injured Workers

As many of our loyal readers know, we occasionally delve into the world of sports for matters that may be of interest to injured workers in Pennsylvania. For example, we have brought up injury problems facing a football player for the Philadelphia Eagles as well as a hockey player for the Philadelphia Flyers.

Perhaps no injury is seen more often in football and hockey these days, however, than concussions. Indeed, as Melissa Gilbert can attest, even Dancing with the Stars can lead to such an injury.

Typically, though, a professional athlete, or an actress, is not doubted about whether an injury has been suffered. Treatment is readily given and the condition is taken very seriously. Often, the injured worker in PA does not have such a luxury.

As this recent article on Science Daily demonstrates, there are many frequently misunderstood facts and myths about concussions, several which can significantly complicate a PA workers’ comp case. For instance, did you know that a concussion will not necessarily show up on a CT scan? How about the fact that one can have a very serious concussion without being knocked unconscious? Another important point shown in this article is the fact that concussions vary from person to person, in symptoms as well as duration.

A concussion (and post-concussion syndrome) can be an incredibly debilitating condition for an injured worker in PA. One can suffer from headaches, depression and difficulty in memory, concentration and sleep, as well as other symptoms. Further, since there is no diagnostic study that can accurately confirm its presence (as an x-ray can do for a broken arm), the worker suffering with a concussion also has to deal with the workers’ comp insurance carrier disputing that he or she is even disabled. As fans of the Philadelphia Flyers know, though, those suffering from concussions have good company, from Eric Lindros and Keith Primeau in the past, to Chris Pronger, Danny Briere, James van Riemsdyk and Claude Giroux just this year. More information and support for these injured workers can be found at http://theconcussionblog.com/.