Articles Posted in Worker Comp Generally

For better or worse, there has not been much happening in the Pennsylvania appellate court system, so we have not be able to post any case law updates.  However, we would like to remind everyone that the next seminar in Brilliant & Neiman LLC’s Continuing Education Series is scheduled for Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. at the firm’s Warminster office (260 West Street Road, Warminster, PA 18974).

Following up on the successful September topic (“Settling a PA Workers’ Compensation Case – What the Injured Worker Has to Know”), October’s subject will be the PA workers’ compensation process.  Come learn about how a case progresses through the system.  What happens after a work injury, including the time frames and details.  What rights and obligations an injured worker has under the Pennsylvania Workers’ Compensation Act.  And, how what you don’t know may actually hurt you.

As with all of our Continuing Education Series, the program is absolutely free, and we want every injured worker (and those who care about him or her) to attend.  However, since space is limited, reservations are required.  To reserve a seat for the program on October 24, 2018, or for any of the additional programs, call 215-638-7500 or e-mail gneiman@bnlegal.com.

Brilliant & Neiman LLC is proud to announce a Continuing Education Series, with topics of interest to the injured worker in Pennsylvania.  The initial seminar in the series will take place on Tuesday, September 25, 2018 at 7:00 p.m., at the headquarters of the firm, 260 West Street Road in Warminster, PA.

The program on September 25, 2018 will be entitled “Settling a PA Workers’ Compensation Case – What the Injured Worker Has to Know.”  We selected this topic to start the series, since we are often asked questions regarding the settlement of workers’ comp cases in Pennsylvania.  Specifically, we will be discussing the timing of a settlement, the factors that go into determining the value of a PA workers’ compensation case (and the factors that, for reasons we will explain, do not), and the process (from the start of the settlement negotiations to the final approval of the Compromise & Release Agreement).

Additional programs will be held in October and November (for those marking their calendars, the dates will be October 24, 2018 and November 29, 2018).  The program in October will examine and explain the PA workers’ compensation litigation process, from the origin of a claim, and the starting of benefits, through litigation when an insurance carrier seeks to reduce or end the benefits.  We felt this topic would be helpful to address the stress an injured worker faces about the direction and future of his or her case.  Finally, the November program will talk about the medical issues involved with an injured worker, specifically, as dealing with chronic pain.  Depending on the level of interest, there could be additional programs added to this series.

Recently, we discussed the status of Senate Bill 936, which was passed by the House.  We are pleased to relate that Governor Thomas Wolf has vetoed this legislation, recognizing that it was a thinly disguised attack on injured workers and not a solution to any problem.

As discussed in the Morning Call, Gov. Wolf said:

Make no mistake, Senate Bill 936 is not a bill designed to fight the opioid crisis. Senate Bill 936 threatens health care for millions of workers who could be injured on the job, including police, corrections officers, and firefighters, who put their lives on the line every day, and whose injuries can be unique, debilitating and severe. It is wrong to sacrifice health care for our first responders to protect the bottom-line for insurance companies and corporations.”

A critical stage of a workers’ compensation case in PA can happen if the injured worker is offered a job by his or her employer.  This may be the regular job, with or without modifications, or a different job entirely.  This is when an injured worker really needs to get representation by an attorney Certified as a Specialist in Workers’ Compensation Law (if he or she has not already done so – many injured workers do not realize that being represented by an attorney DOES NOT COST A DIME unless and until the case goes to court, or the case settles).

Whether (and how) to respond to the employer, and whether to go back and try the job, will always depend on the circumstances in each case.  Keep in mind that case law is not friendly to the injured workers in many areas of workers’ compensation law in PA, including this one.  For example, the modifications an employer would be willing to make to a job may not need to be stated in the job offer.

This time in a workers’ comp case is a critical one.  If the injured worker makes a rash decision, without the benefit of advice from an attorney Certified as a Specialist in Workers’ Compensation Law, the case may be irreparably damaged.  Since obtaining the services of an attorney will not cost anything, is there really a reason to handle these things without counsel?

Previously, we have warned of the pending legislation that will restrict the access of injured workers across the State of Pennsylvania to get medications they need.  Now, thanks to the House passing Senate Bill 936, the legislation heads to the Governor.  It is not bad enough that innocent people suffered injuries at work, now they have to deal with the reality that they will be treated different than patients who are not in the Pennsylvania workers’ compensation system.

As noted in an article on Pennlive.com, this legislation “was drawn up in response to reports in the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News about doctors and law firms specializing in worker’s compensation that were operating their own pharmacies.”  Perhaps someone would be kind enough to explain why the legislation did not simply prohibit the ownership of pharmacies by these groups?  Instead, this legislation does not even deal with this issue.  At all.  Rather, the legislation makes medications (all medications, not just the opioids that caused all of the supposed angst) more difficult for an injured worker in PA to obtain.

And, again we ask, is this fair?  Is this how our elected representatives protect us?  By making sure that we have difficulty getting medications if we are unlucky enough to be injured at work?  We urge all injured workers, those who care about injured workers and those who care about fairness and justice, to reach out to their legislators, and reach out to the Governor’s office, and let everyone know this will not be done without a fight!

On our blog, as you probably noticed, we like to share court opinions which are of interest to the injured worker in PA.  Typically, of course, these opinions deal with interpretations of the Pennsylvania Workers’ Compensation Act (Act).  Also, typically, these are opinions rendered by the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania.  Why that court?  And are all decisions of Commonwealth Court the same?  Glad you asked!

Once a Workers’ Compensation Judge (WCJ) renders a decision, the next level of appellate review is the Workers’ Compensation Appeal Board (WCAB).  This is a process we have discussed on this blog in the past.  Decisions rendered by the WCAB can be cited to WCJs, by attorneys, in future cases, but the WCAB opinions are only “persuasive” not “binding.”  This means that a WCJ need not follow a decision of the WCAB.  For this reason, we rarely devote a blog posting to a WCAB decision.

After the WCAB issues a decision, an appeal can be taken to the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania.  Like with the WCAB, an appeal to Commonwealth Court is a right, so the Commonwealth Court cannot decline an appeal.  The Commonwealth Court will then make a decision.  This is either “reported” or “unreported.”  These terms have their usual meaning – a “reported” decision is published in a law reporter; an “unpublished” one may not.  More importantly, as a practical matter, a “reported” decision can be cited in future cases (and is binding on both the WCJ and the WCAB).  While an “unreported” case can be cited in future cases, like a WCAB opinion, it is not binding on a WCJ (only persuasive).  Though they are far more plentiful, “unpublished” decisions are not typically made blog posts by us.  They simply are not as significant, since they need not be followed.  Note that an “unpublished” on “unreported” decision, upon motion of a party, could be changed to “published” or “reported.”

We have often discussed the importance of winning a case before the Workers’ Compensation Judge (WCJ).  This is because the WCJ is the “ultimate finder of fact.”  Determinations of credibility made by a WCJ cannot be challenged on appeal.  Indeed, appellate courts can only change the decision of a WCJ if there has been an “error of law.”  Given this great power held by the WCJ, it is critical that an injured worker’s case be litigated as well as possible before the WCJ.

We say this to point out that it really does matter what PA workers’ comp attorney an injured worker selects.  Certainly, one can simply search on the internet and find many attorneys from which to choose.  But, therein lies the difficulty – how should an injured worker in Pennsylvania choose his or her workers’ compensation attorney?

To try to bring some common sense to this situation, we have added a page to our website, intended to help an injured worker make this important selection.  Obviously, we would like an injured worker to call us, but whether you do or not, these are some things an injured worker can consider when making this important decision.

Pennsylvania’s legislators try their best to represent their constituents; I believe this is true the vast majority of times.  But, there are certainly times when the results of their actions are very difficult to reconcile with the best interests of those they have sworn to protect.

Currently pending in the PA legislature is House Bill 18/Senate Bill 936.  If passed, this legislation would completely change how an injured worker in Pennsylvania can receive medications.  A “drug formulary” would be set up.  This means that no longer would a patient be treated based on the individual needs of the patient, and the individual judgement of his or her doctor.  Nope.  Instead, decisions would be based on “evidence-based medicine.”  That means that what medications would generally be prescribed for a given condition, for the period generally prescribed, would be all that an injured worker in PA could receive.

Therefore, the individual judgment of the doctor is totally irrelevant.  The needs of the patient?  Not a factor.  This is an absurd system, since medicine is not an exact science.  Indeed, any physician will openly admit that not every patient will react to every condition in the same way.  Some heal faster than others.  Not every patient has exactly the same symptoms or limitations, even from the same condition.

As we have previously mentioned, the Pennsylvania Bureau of Workers’ Compensation rarely provides official or formal notice regarding the addition or subtraction of Workers’ Compensation Judges (WCJs) in the Commonwealth.  As usual, it is up to us to point out these changes, from our contact with other attorneys, and from our appearances in the many workers’ compensation hearing offices across PA.

Along these lines, we announce, with mixed feelings, the retirement of The Honorable Paul Baker.  Over his illustrious career, Judge Baker has presided over cases in Philadelphia, Pottsville and Harrisburg (at least these are the courts where we have appeared before him over the years).  Judge Baker was always known for his thoughtful and thorough handling of his cases, and we will miss his intelligence and compassion from the bench.  On the other hand, we are thrilled for him personally, in that he can step away from the bench, and enjoy his retirement.

Please join us in congratulating Judge Baker on a wonderful career as a jurist, and wishing him well in his retirement!

We are proud when our attorneys are asked to participate in continuing legal education seminars.  Being invited to help educate other lawyers can only be viewed as a tremendous compliment.  And, so we are pleased to relay that one of our attorneys, Glenn Neiman, has been invited by the Workers’ Compensation Section of the Bucks County Bar Association to act as a moderator in a continuing legal education seminar the Section is presenting later this month.

The topic of the seminar will be addressing the interplay between the Heart & Lung Act (a benefit program to which police, firefighters and other first responders qualify) and the Pennsylvania Workers’ Compensation Act.  Since these two laws can both impact cases in different ways, it is important for attorneys who handle either of these types of cases to be aware of both laws.